Today’s breakfast

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Eggs, nuggets, and toasts.

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MeisterShack Burger

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We tried this new burger at Shake Shack and we were not disappointed! Juicy and delicious!

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Chicken Adobo

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Wifey did a great job again with this delicious Pinoy fave.

Chicken Adobo is an authentic Filipino dish and is one of the mostly recognized Filipino foods. This Chicken Adobo Recipe is the simplest that you can get. Not to be mistaken with Mexican adobo, this dish is uniquely prepared by stewing chicken in vinegar and soy sauce.Several sources who are experts in Asian food history say that the Filipinos were already cooking adobo even before Spanish colonization. The cooking method is termed as “inadobo” which is the very same method in this Chicken Adobo Recipe. It is also said that cooking with vinegar preserves the meat. This method is also considered as one of the earliest food preservation practice.

Chicken Adobo Recipe

Ingredients

2 lbs chicken, cut into serving pieces
3 pcs dried bay leaves
4 tbsp soy sauce
2 tbsp vinegar
3 cloves garlic, crushed
1 to 2 cups water
1/4 cup cooking oil
1/2 tablespoon white sugar
salt and whole peppercorn

Cooking Procedure

In a large container, combine the soy sauce and garlic then marinade the chicken for at least 3 hours
Place the cooking oil in a pan and apply heat
When the oil is hot enough, put-in the marinated chicken.
Cook all the sides for about 5 minutes.
Pour-in the remaining marinade and add water.
Bring to a boil
Add the dried bay leaves and whole peppercorn.
Simmer for 30 minutes or until the chicken is tender
Add vinegar.
Stir and cook for 10 minutes.
Put-in the  sugar, and salt.
Stir and turn the heat off.
Serve hot.
Share and Enjoy!

Recipe by http://panlasangpinoy.com/2009/03/09/filipino-food-chicken-adobo-recipe/

Beef Sisig

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Beef sisig is a variation of the famous pork sisig. Unlike the pork sisig that use pig’s head as the main ingredient, the beef sisig use beef tenderloin.

Ingredients:
1 kilo beef tenderloin, with fat
1/4 kilo beef liver or chicken Liver
1/2 cup soy Sauce
1/2 cup vinegar
5 pcs bird’s eye chili or siling labuyo, crushed
4 medium size white onion, chop into small cubes
1 head garlic, minced
1 green bell pepper, chopped into small cubes
1 red bell pepper, chopped into small cubes
3 pcs lemon or calamansi
1/2 cup mayonnaise
1 beef broth cubesalt and pepper
How to cook beef sisig:
Slice the beef into strips about half an inch thick.
Marinate in soy sauce and vinegar for about one hour.
Then fry the marinated beef until golden brown and set aside.
Boil the beef or chicken liver and fry it the same as you did in the beef strips.
Set aside.
Slice the fried livers into medium size cubes. Set aside.
In a wok or a heavy skillet, heat about 1 tablespoon oil and saute garlic and onion, chili and bell pepper.
Then pour about 1/2 cup of the soy sauce and vinegar mixture from the beef marinade.
Simmer for a few minutes then add the pepper and beef broth cube.
Add salt according to your desired taste. Then pour the it on the fried beef strips and liver.
Put the mayonnaise and some lemon juice to give  a little sourness and mix until all the ingredients are well coated with mayo.
Serve hot.

http://www.panlasangpinoymeatrecipes.com/beef-sisig.htm

Menudo

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Don’t get this confused with the Mexican Menudo as this is very different, though they have the same colour which is red, the similarity ends there. Not sure if the Philippine menudo originated from it, but most probably the origins of this dish is Spanish like the Afritada and Callos but if there is someone who knows the history of this dish let me know as I am interested on that information.

Menudo is a very common dish in Philippines similar to Sinigang; it is always a main stay on Filipino Restaurants as well as the street eateries (we call it carinderia). Usually paired with rice but some people eat this with bread like pandesal which I only discovered when I met my wife. There are a lot of different versions but the concept remains the same, pork in tomato sauce. Some put green peas, some use tripe and some add green capsicum but regardless of the version the taste nearly remains the same.This dish is one of my wife’s specialty and she does it way better than me, so if you want to give it a shot here it is.Ingredients600g pork belly, cut in small cubes200g pork liver, cut in small cubes1 large potato, cut in small cubes1 large carrot, cut into small cubes1 cup green peas1/3 cup raisins1 red capsicum, cut in small cubes1 medium sized red onion, diced2 cups chicken stock1/2 cup tomato paste3 large red tomatoes, diced6 cloves garlic, minced2 pcs bay leaves1 tsp rubbed basilfreshly ground black pepperfish sauceoilMethodOn at pot sauté garlic and onion in oil.Add pork and brown on all sides.Add chicken stock and bay leaves. Bring to a boil and simmer for 10 minutes.Add potatoes, carrots, liver, red capsicum, tomatoes and basil and tomato paste. Simmer for 15 minutes in medium heat.Add raisins and green peas then simmer for 5 more minutes.Flavour with fish sauce and season with freshly ground black pepper.

http://angsarap.net/2013/04/08/menudo/

Umi Sushi

Umi Sushi is a Japanese restaurant. My wife loves anything Japanese, so we decided to have dinner here for my son’s birthday.

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Ebi Tempura. Shrimps tempura with Ponzu sauce.

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Yasai Tempura. Assorted vegetables tempura with Ponzu and creamy wasabi sauce.

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Beef Teriyaki. Simmered beef with Teriyaki sauce and grilled vegetables.

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Vegetable Fried Rice. Mixed vegetables and egg.

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Garlic Fried Rice. Mixed vegetables and garlic.

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California Maki. Crabstick, avocado, mayo, cucumber and tobiko.

Shake Shack

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Nando’s

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Another fave resto with very flavorful chicken – Nando’s!

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Hot sauces!

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Drinks!

Pork Nilaga

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Nilagang Baboy or Pork Nilaga is translated as boiled pork in Filipino. This is a soup dish commonly served for lunch or dinner on regular days. Nilagang Baboy is eaten with steamed white rice and is best served with patis (fish sauce) and siling labuyo (birds eye chili). (http://panlasangpinoy.com/2014/01/27/nilagang-baboy/)

Adobong Baboy

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Adobo (Filipino language: “marinade,” “sauce” or “seasoning”) is the name of a popular dish and cooking process in Philippine cuisine that involves meat, seafood, or vegetables marinated in a sauce of vinegar, soy sauce, and garlic, browned in oil, and simmered in the marinade. It has sometimes been considered as the unofficial national dish of the Philippines. This one on the photo was made by my wife and used pork as the main ingredient.